About Us

No fancy stories here.

We had a very humble beginning. And though we have grown leaps and bounds in a very short span of time, we intend to continue being humble in all ways possible.

We started as a technical blog in 2014. And our first student was none other than a very close friend from the place I used to work. Impressed, it was this friend who insisted and convinced us that we must do the ‘teaching’ more often, and for more people.

I started small, equipped with just my laptop, decent internet and a zeal to teach. Taught a few small batches in my personal capacity over weekends for around an year.  Come August 2016, I had an offer from one of the leading online educational platforms. I joined as a part-timer (weekends only) and left soon after because of creative differences in teaching methodologies (more on it later).

I founded Inquimind in April 2017. It was the culmination of two very different teaching styles:

  1. The personal attention and detail one can give to their students, when teaching in individual capacity.
  2. The structured and organised approach that established online educational platform can bring to the learning.

Inquimind is an effort to bring the best of both worlds, so that you as a student won’t have to compromise on any one.

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Inquimind

Born Curious, Die Curious.

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Why We founded Inquimind?

My experience with Other Platforms

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Now, coming to the ‘creative difference’ and how does it matter to you

All the well-known educational platforms are backed by millions of dollars from Investors. Investors whose sole purpose is to see their investment grow, as much and as fast as possible. This results in set revenue targets, pre-defined and concise courses materials and instructors who are made to rush through their batches, so that the next batch can start.

After all, the money comes only at the start of the batch.

As an Instructor for one of these platforms, I was handed over a set syllabus and pre-defined hours. Which was grossly inadequate for a subject matter as vast as Big Data and Hadoop.

I had no freedom to teach anything more than what their syllabus said, nor could I employ teaching methodologies that would take more time, but were better at making students understand the complex part of the subject. The whole experience was very monotonous, both for the instructor and the students.

And that’s why I left after completing just 2 batches. And the rest is a history.

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